9 Best Nutmeg Substitutes

Nutmeg is the inner seed of the Myristica fragrans tree, which is native to Indonesia. The spice is made by grinding the dried seed. Nutmeg has a strong, warm flavor and is used in baking.

It’s often used in Jamaican dishes like jerk chicken or pork. You can also find it in many desserts, such as pumpkin pie and apple pie.

Not having nutmeg on hand can put a damper on your cooking plans, but don’t worry, I’ve got you covered. There are plenty of great substitutes for nutmeg that will add flavor to your dish.

9 Best Nutmeg Substitutes

1. Mace

Mace

Mace is a spice that is very similar to nutmeg because it comes from the same tree. It is the outer covering of the nutmeg seed.

It’s a spice that has a similar flavor profile to nutmeg. Mace is slightly softer in flavor than nutmeg and has a warm, sweet taste. Mace is often used in baking and desserts.

You may use equal amounts of mace and nutmeg.

2. Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a spice made from the inner bark of Cinnamomum trees. It has a warm, sweet flavor with a hint of spice. Cinnamon is used in sweet and savory dishes.

It’s often used in baking, such as cinnamon rolls and apple pies. You can also find it in savory dishes like Moroccan lamb stew.

Cinnamon is much stronger than nutmeg, so try using half the amount of cinnamon in place of the nutmeg. You can always add more after tasting if needed.

3. Allspice

Allspice is a spice made from the dried berries of the Pimenta dioica tree. Allspice has a sweet, warm flavor with hints of clove and cinnamon.

It’s often used in baking and desserts. You can also find it in savory dishes like Jamaican jerk chicken. To substitute nutmeg in recipes, use the same amount of allspice.

4. Cloves

Cloves

Cloves are the dried flower buds of the Syzygium aromaticum tree. They have a sweet, warm flavor with a hint of spice. Cloves are used in both sweet and savory dishes.

They’re often used in baking, such as gingerbread cookies and fruitcakes. You can also find them in savory dishes like mulled wine and ham glazes.

When switching nutmeg for ground cloves, use half the recommended amount. If the recipe specifies both nutmeg and ground cloves, you may want to use another spice instead of using only cloves as it can overpower the flavor.

5. Garam Masala

If you’re making an Indian dish that calls for nutmeg, garam masala is the best substitute. This spice blend is made with a variety of spices like cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, and cumin.

It will give your food the same warm and sweet flavor as nutmeg. Add it in at the beginning of cooking so the flavors have time to meld together.

It’s best to use garam masala as a substitute for savory foods since it contains other spices that would be inappropriate for desserts. Use same amount of garam masala as you would nutmeg.

6. Pumpkin Pie Spice

Pumpkin pie spice is a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and allspice. Since nutmeg is one of the ingredients in pumpkin pie spice, if you use it as a nutmeg substitutes, you’ll still have some nutmeg flavors in your dish.

It’s the perfect substitute for nutmeg in baking recipes like pumpkin pie or spiced cookies. Add it to oatmeal or coffee for a Fall-inspired flavor.

You can find it in dishes like pumpkin pies and spice cookies. In most cases, you may simply replace nutmeg with pumpkin pie spice in the same proportions.

7. Cardamom

Cardamom has a similar flavor to nutmeg but is more pungent. It’s often used in Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine.

Cardamom is used in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s often used in baking, such as in Scandinavian Christmas cookies and cakes. Add it to curries, meat dishes, or rice pudding for a warm and spicy flavor.

While cardamom has a strong flavor, it may be difficult to substitute due to its distinctiveness; however, if your recipe only calls for a tiny amount of nutmeg, a little bit of cardamom might suffice as a last resort.

8. Ginger

Ginger

Ginger is a popular spice that is used in many Asian dishes. It has a warm, sweet flavor with a bit of a kick.

Ginger is used in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s often used in baking, such as in gingerbread cookies and cakes. Add it to stir-fries, soups, or marinades for a similar flavor to nutmeg.

Ginger is a perfect substitute for nutmeg in savory dishes but you might not want to use it in sweet dishes like desserts.

9. Apple Pie Spice

Apple pie spice is a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. It’s the perfect substitute for nutmeg in baking recipes like apple pie or spiced cookies. Add it to oatmeal or coffee for a Fall-inspired flavor.

You can find it in dishes like apple pies and spice cookies. Use half the amount of apple spice as you would nutmeg.

So there you have it, 9 of the best nutmeg substitutes. Now you can make your favorite recipes without worrying about not having nutmeg on hand.

When cooking or baking, experiment with these spices to find the perfect flavor for your dish.

Related Questions:

What Does Nutmeg Taste Like?

Nutmeg has a warm, sweet flavor with hints of spice. It’s often used in baking and desserts. You can also find it in savory dishes like curries and stews.

Is Mace the Same as Nutmeg?

Mace is the outer covering of the nutmeg seed. It’s a spice that has a similar flavor profile to nutmeg. Mace is slightly softer in flavor than nutmeg and has a warm, sweet taste. Mace is often used in baking and desserts.

What Herbs Work With Nutmeg?

Herbs that work well with nutmeg include:

Conclusion

There are many spices that can be used as substitutes for nutmeg. The best substitutes for nutmeg are mace, allspice, and cloves. These spices have similar flavor profiles to nutmeg and can be used in many of the same dishes.

I hope this article has helped clear up any questions you may have had about what to use in place of nutmeg. Have a recipe that calls for nutmeg? Give one of these substitutes a try and let me know how it goes!

I’m a passionate food blogger on a journey to become a go-to person who can help others prepare delicious foods. I share recipes, food substitutes, and other cooking tips. Read more about my journey...

Leave a Comment