11 Best Spelt Flour Substitutes

Do you love baking?

If so, then you’re probably familiar with the term “spelt flour.” It’s a type of flour that is made from an ancient grain called spelt wheat.

Spelt flour has been around for centuries and was once widely used in Europe before it was replaced by modern wheat varieties.

Today, spelt flour is making a comeback because many people who are not severely gluten intolerant can still eat it without any problems.

However, if you want to bake something delicious using spelt flour but don’t have any on hand or don’t know where to buy some, fret not!

I have got eleven spelt flour substitutes for you that will work as well as the original ingredient in your recipes!

What is Spelt Flour?

Spelt Flour is a type of whole wheat flour that is made from an ancient grain called spelt.

It has more protein than most other types of wheat, but it also contains gluten like most other common types of wheat.

However, the gluten in spelt tends to be easier for many people with gluten intolerance to digest without having unpleasant symptoms.

The following flours can be used as substitutes for spelt flour when baking bread and other baked goods at home:

11 Best Spelt Flour Substitutes

Below are the 11 different types of flours that can be substituted for spelt flour when baking bread and other baked goods.

1. Einkorn Flour

Einkorn Flour

Einkorn flour is a type of wheat flour that is made from einkorn wheat.

It’s a fairly new alternative to spelt for those who have issues digesting modern strains of wheat, but it can still be used as a substitute for spelt in most recipes.

Einkorn has a similar taste and texture to spelt flour, but it might be a little trickier to use since einkorn is less common.

2. Kamut Flour

Kamut flour is made from the ancient grain “Kamut” which was once known as “King Tut’s Wheat.”

It contains gluten like regular wheat, but it’s often easier to digest.

It also has a nutty taste and can be substituted for spelt flour in most recipes.

3. Amaranth Flour

Amaranth Flour

Amaranth flour is made from amaranth seeds which are ground up into a fine powdery texture.

Since the particles of amaranth flour are fine and powdery, they may not bind together as well as if you were to use spelt.

However, this doesn’t mean that it won’t work for baking purposes! Just be sure to mix the amaranth flour into your other ingredients very thoroughly.

You can then use it in place of spelt flour in most recipes.

Amaranth is good for baking bread, muffins, cookies, cakes, and other baked goods.

4. Barley Flour

Barley flour is made from ground-up hull-less barley kernels or “berries” which give it a slightly sweet taste.

Since barley contains gluten like most other types of wheat, it’s best to use it in recipes that call for spelt flour if you want them to turn out.

However, if you don’t mind some more “whole-mealness” in your bread and baked goods, then barley flour can be a great substitute for spelt and will likely give the same result as using regular spelt flour.

5. Rice Flour

Rice flour is made from finely milled rice kernels which are ground up to give it a very fine powdery consistency.

Oftentimes, rice flour is mixed with other types of flour in baked goods.

However, it can also be used alone or blended with other flours for a milder taste and finer texture.

Rice flour is best used when combined with other types of flour since it can have a gritty consistency when used alone.

That being said, it works great as a substitute for spelt flour when you want a finer texture.

6. Oat Flour

Oat Flour

Oat flour is made from ground-up hulled oat groats which are simply whole oats with their outer shells removed.

Because of its coarser consistency, it works best as a substitute for spelt if mixed with other flours to produce a lighter taste and texture.

7. Buckwheat flour

Buckwheat flour is made from ground-up buckwheat kernels which have a unique taste and a darker color than most other types of flour.

It also contains gluten, but it has a unique flavor that many people find enjoyable – just be sure to try it out in some recipes before you make a whole batch of baked goods with buckwheat flour.

8. Whole Wheat Flour

Whole wheat flour is made from finely milled hard red winter wheat kernels which contain gluten and imparts a strong taste and texture to your recipes.

Because it has such a strong flavor, whole wheat flour works great as a substitute for spelt flour if you want to give your baked goods a stronger overall taste.

9. Pastry Flour

Pastry flour is made from softer red winter wheat which gives it a finer texture than whole wheat flour.

When using pastry flour, be sure to only use ¼ cup of pastry flour for every 1 cup of spelt flour that the recipe calls for.

This will give you a lighter consistency and less of a strong taste than if you were to use whole wheat pastry flour.

You can substitute all-purpose or granulated white flour for pastry flour, but it won’t have the same effect as using pastry flour alone.

10. Rye Flour

Rye Flour

Rye flour is made from finely milled rye kernels which give it a very strong, coarse taste and texture.

Despite its coarser consistency, rye flour can be used as a substitute for spelt flour, but only if you mix it with other flours to produce a lighter taste and finer texture.

11. Quinoa Flour

Quinoa Flour

Quinoa flour is made from ground quinoa seeds which contain a slightly nutty flavor.

It’s best used when mixed with other flours to produce a lighter taste and texture, but it does work well as a substitute for spelt if you don’t mind the coarser consistency.

Quinoa flour is best used in recipes that call for spelt flour if you want the same results.

What Does Spelt Flour Taste Like?

Spelt flour has a sweeter, nuttier flavor than whole wheat or most other types of brown flour.

It’s especially good for baking since it also has a slightly finer texture than other types of whole wheat flour.

That being said, spelt flour is often used in many recipes if you want to give your baked goods a lighter taste and finer texture without having to use any specialized ingredients.

Is Spelt Flour the Same as Whole Wheat Flour?

Spelt and whole wheat flour are often used interchangeably since they’re both made from the same kernel and have very similar textures and tastes.

However, spelt flour has a slightly lighter consistency than whole wheat which makes it better at producing a finer texture in baked goods without making them too dense. 

Can I Use Plain Flour Instead of Spelt Flour?

You can substitute plain flour for spelt flour in most recipes, but the results may be different and you’ll need to experiment with how much you use.

That being said, using plain white or whole wheat flour should work just fine as a substitute for spelt when baking since they both have similar textures when used alone.

What to Add to Spelt Flour to Make It Self-Raising?

You can use baking powder to make spelt flour self-raising, but it won’t rise as much as you would expect if you were using regular all-purpose flour.

What’s the Difference Between Spelt Flour and Other Flours?

Spelt flour differs from other types of wheat flour like whole wheat flour because it contains less gluten than regular whole wheat. However, it can be used in place of whole wheat flour in most recipes.

Spelt also contains less protein than other types of wheat, which allows it to produce baked goods that are lighter and fluffier than those made with regular wheat flour.

This is why many people who cut out gluten from their diets choose spelt over any other type of flour.

Final Words

We hope you enjoyed this list of substitutes for spelt flour and that it helped you find a new favorite. Let us know which one is your favorite!

I’m a passionate food blogger on a journey to become a go-to person who can help others prepare delicious foods. I share recipes, food substitutes, and other cooking tips. Read more about my journey...

2 thoughts on “11 Best Spelt Flour Substitutes”

  1. Good morning and a happy Tuesday. I am not able to use Spelt flour. May I use Coconut flour or Almond flour, or the combination of both? I have a grandson whose allergic to eggs, dairy, and wheat flours.

    Thank you for your kind directions – Pepe

    Reply
    • Yes, you can use coconut flour in place of spelt flour but not in a 1:1 ratio. Instead, substitute coconut flour for spelt flour at a 1:4 ratio and you can also pair it with almond flour.

      Reply

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